How is child custody impacted by a parent’s substance abuse?

| Jun 1, 2021 | Child Custody |

Many factors are considered in a Minnesota child custody case. This is true when the parents initially part ways and can even extend to after a court determination has been made. Substance abuse is a problem that can result in losing child custody and having limited time with the child. For parents concerned about its impact on the custody arrangement, there are certain facts to remember.

How courts might address a parent’s substance abuse problem

There are available options when there is substance abuse and worry about the well-being of the child. The key aspect of a custody determination and parenting time is the best interests of the child. Substance abuse by the parent can place the child in jeopardy, hinder attempts at caring for them and be the catalyst for court intervention. The courts will step in if there are complaints that a parent is using illegal drugs, abusing prescription medications or abusing alcohol and it is putting the child at risk.

The courts will investigate these allegations thoroughly as part of its decision as to whether the child’s best interests are being served. If the allegations are found to be true, the parent could be denied custody, parenting time, need supervised visitation or be denied access to the child entirely. Parents who report another parent should provide evidence such as a police report. Parents dealing with these problems will likely need to prove that they have sought help through treatment before there can be a restoration of child custody and parenting time

Experienced family law professionals may help with substance abuse concerns

After a relationship ends, the parents will want to ensure the child is in a safe, nurturing environment and provided with the necessities and more. Substance abuse can inhibit that and cause problems for the child in extensive ways. For those who are concerned that the other parent is dealing with these challenges, it is imperative to act. Having guidance is important and qualified representation may be essential.