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Bird nest custody -- a new look at child custody

Like with just about everything else in life, aspects surrounding divorce are changing. The way in which child custody is viewed is trending toward true co-parenting. With a greater awareness of what is truly in the best interest of a child, the views of the courts as well as parents have changed over recent years.

In Minnesota and elsewhere, shared custody has become something many parents consider and courts prefer. To that end the concept of birdnesting is gaining in popularity. In this instance, children remain in one place -- usually the marital residence -- and the parents take turns to live with their children in that home. This type of custody is still quite uncommon and courts will only consider it if the parents both buy into the idea and make a formal request to that effect.

There are a number of positives embedded in this form of custody.  First, children experience stability as they remain in the same home, while parents move in and out according to the parenting plan. A second benefit is that parents can communicate with ease by leaving notes or a quick chat as they alternate custodial time. A third positive is that extracurricular activities are easier to manage for the children as equipment remains on hand.

As with everything, there are also certain negative aspects. The first disadvantage is the costs involved. Three homes instead of two can have substantial financial implications. It also makes it more difficult for parents to become involved in new relationships. In addition, parents who battle to get along may find exchanges difficult and awkward.   

Before deciding on bird's nest child custody, Minnesota parents have to carefully consider if this form of shared custody will be in the best interests of any children involved.  An experienced family law attorney will be able to guide and advise a client as to the possible pitfalls as well as the benefits of the arrangements. Once both parents have all the facts, an informed decision can be made and an effective parenting plan implemented.

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